Atwoods Limited: 01372 459777

G C Stevens: 01932 820444

Investment & Savings Advice

Why do I need to invest?

To meet both short and long term investment needs. Short term needs may include saving for a car or a holiday, whereas long term investment needs could be saving for retirement, school fees or providing capital for children as they grow up.

Helping you with your Portfolio

The various assets owned by an investor are called a portfolio. As a general rule, spreading your money between the different types of asset classes helps lower the risk of your overall portfolio underperforming.

Managing investments takes time. This is where we can help, both in advising you on your investment needs and assisting you in managing your portfolio.

Please contact us so that we may assist you in determining an investment strategy best appropriate for your needs and circumstances.




Lifetime ISA accounts

From April 2017, any adult under 40 will be able to open a new Lifetime ISA. Up to £4,000 can be saved each year and savers will receive a 25% bonus from the government on this money.

Money put into this account can be saved until you are over 60 and used as retirement income, or you can withdraw it to help buy your first home.

The value of investments and income from them may go down. You may not get back the original amount invested




Individual Savings Accounts (ISAs)

You can save tax-free with Individual Savings Accounts (ISAs).

In the 2017 to 2018 tax year, the maximum you can save in ISAs is £20,000

There are a number of different types of ISAs, including:

  • Junior ISA (under 18s)
  • Cash ISAs
  • Stocks and shares ISAs
  • Innovative finance ISAs
  • Lifetime ISA

Each tax year you can put money into one of each kind of ISA. The tax year runs from 6 April to 5 April.

You can save up to £20,000 in one type of account or split the allowance across 2 or 3 types.

The value of investments and income from them may go down. You may not get back the original amount invested.

Tax treatment depends on the individual circumstances of each client and may be subject to change in future.



Unit Trusts.

A unit trust reduces your risk of investing in the stock market by pooling your savings with thousands of others, and then spreading the money across a wide range of shares or other types of investment.




OEICs.

Open Ended Investment Companies were introduced into the UK in 1997, from Europe. Open-ended means shares in the fund will be created as investors invest and cancelled as they cash in.

OEIC's quote a single price, and a levy which shows the costs of buying/selling.




Investment Trusts.

Investment Trusts are companies that buy and sell shares in other companies. When you invest in an investment trust company, you become a shareholder of that company. Your shares will rise and fall in value according to supply and demand for the shares.

Unlike a Unit Trust and an OEIC, the number of shares within an investment trust is limited (there are only so many that can be bought and sold at any time). This means that as well as being influenced by the value of the assets held by the Investment Trust, their price is determined by investor demand, rising with popularity, and vice versa. This means that a share in an Investment Trust can be more expensive than the total costs of the relative assets in the investment: this is called trading “at a premium”. If the reverse is true, it is said to be trading “at a discount”. This adds another layer of risk for investors in an Investment Trust, but can also create buying opportunities.




THE VALUE OF INVESTMENTS AND INCOME FROM THEM MAY GO DOWN. YOU MAY NOT GET BACK THE ORIGINAL AMOUNT INVESTED.